Loiding

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Loiding is the use of a flat object such as a credit card to shim spring-latch locks on doors.
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= Loiding =
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'''Loiding''' (or '''carding''') is a [[bypass]] technique that uses a flat object, such as some, e.g. a US, credit card, to retract inward-opening spring-supported [[latch]]es. The flat object, referred to as a shim or 'loid, is slid between the latch and [[strike]] plate and used to push back (i.e retract) the latch. Some modern spring-latch doors use a deadlatch or dead locking plunger to prevent loiding. Loiding may also be referred to as 'slipping' or  ''shimming'', though that is a more generic technique used to open various types of locking mechanisms.
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The term loiding comes from celluloid, used for early photographic and cinematic film, strips or sheets of which were cut to size and used for entry. It became known amongst many British criminals as a loid.
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Loiding is generally a [[Surreptitious Entry|surreptitious]] attack but certain tools and techniques might leave behind [[Forensics|forensic]] evidence.
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== See also ==
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* [[Bypass]]
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* [[Lockpicking]]
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* [[Covert Entry]]
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* [[Surreptitious Entry]]
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[[Category:Bypass]]
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[[Category:Surreptitious Entry]]
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[[Category:Covert Entry]]
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{{Stub}}

Latest revision as of 13:02, 30 December 2014

[edit] Loiding

Loiding (or carding) is a bypass technique that uses a flat object, such as some, e.g. a US, credit card, to retract inward-opening spring-supported latches. The flat object, referred to as a shim or 'loid, is slid between the latch and strike plate and used to push back (i.e retract) the latch. Some modern spring-latch doors use a deadlatch or dead locking plunger to prevent loiding. Loiding may also be referred to as 'slipping' or shimming, though that is a more generic technique used to open various types of locking mechanisms.

The term loiding comes from celluloid, used for early photographic and cinematic film, strips or sheets of which were cut to size and used for entry. It became known amongst many British criminals as a loid.

Loiding is generally a surreptitious attack but certain tools and techniques might leave behind forensic evidence.

[edit] See also


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